Color Separations II CMYK

Scale of the subtractive primaries cyan, magen...

CMYK Separations

SAILINGrgbClick to Open the Sailing file (image above), save to desktop, open in Photoshop and change it from RGB to CMYK. ( you are selecting a color space that corresponds with where you image ultimately ends up, or how it will be printed—this is the Destination Color space/profile)

  • EDIT>>CONVERT TO PROFILE>>US WEB COATED (SWOP) v2

save result as a TIFF file to your disk

Open a new Illustrator file. Set the document set-up at letter size or 36 x 48 picas, vertical (portrait) orientation.

PLACE (Import) the Sailing.tif file from your disk

Use the eyedropper to sample and Colormatch the red-orange from the red sailboat with a PMS Uncoated spot color and add it to your swatches window. Refer to this tip to complete this step: Process to Spot

Open the Nature Symbols Library window.
Menu>>Window>>Symbols Library (not Symbols)>>Nature

Select the shark and drag on to your layout.

  • Change the shark Symbol to a graphic by the Expand command (Object>>Expand)
  • Ungroup (you may have to do this several times to completely separate the image into separate parts.)
  • OptionCopy two more shark and let ‘em swim in the ocean! (this is a create and release program)
  • On one of the sharks, change the colors to the PMS red-orange spot color colormatch you created + tints of it and black
  • (open the color swatch in the COLOR palette, drag the slider in the color dialog to create tints then drag those into the swatch window to use) Make a 75%, 50%, & 25% tint of the red color.
  • Use the eyedropper to select a fill color of one of the shark shapes, then from the Menu>>Select>>Same>>Fill to group select all shapes that are made of the same color fill. Replace with one of the PMS tints you made. Repeat this process on the other two sharks with different tints until all of the sharks have been converted over to tints of the Pantone color. Create new layers for each of these tinted shark parts. Turning the visibility of these individual layers off after each of its colors have been changed will enable you to tell when all of the shark parts are converted.
  • ReGroup the shark parts (all symbols from the graphics libraries may be further customized or edited in this general manner)
  • Copy and Paste the digital history text file into a text box that is as wide as the sailing image.
  • Keep the text alignment Flush Left but Center the text file over the image vertically (not horizontally) Use the Align window to do this.
  • Bring the text file to front if it is not on top already.
  • Move both text and image down on the page so that there is room for both on the page.
  • Position the text so that the last two paragraphs overlap the image in the sky area. You will need to move the image lower on the page than the tex for this to happen.
  • Change the Title to Gill Sans 21 pt, PMS red-orange colormatch
  • From the main Print window select All Marks and Bleeds
  • Next Select Output>>Mode>>and Separations (host based)
  • You will see this option grayed out unless the correct PPD has been selected              
  • To change the PPD file for a printer you’ve already added:
  1. Open System Preferences, click Print & Fax, and then click Printing.
  2. Click the Printer Setup button.
  3. Choose Printer Model from the top pop-up menu. Choose the item appropriate for your printer from the lower pop-up menu and select your printer from the Model Name list.
  4. Click Apply Changes.
  • You may further control what items will print, or separate, by placing each item in its own layers first, then making only the layers you want to print visible and finally, at the bottom of the main Print window, General and selecting Print Visible Layers from the Print Layers option.
  • Print separations—From the Output option in the Print window, change the mode from Composite to Separations. You should then see what colors will be printing as separations. In this case, you should get 5 plates (C,M,Y, K + PMS spot). Select the “Overprint Black” option to  avoid the type knocking out of each of the process color plates and instead print on top of the image. (Notice that you also have the option at this stage to “Convert all Spot Colors to Process” colors. You would only do this if the spot was not part of a visual identity or otherwise critical and that the conversion from spot to process will produce reasonably similar results in the hue.)

Screen shot 2013-01-18 at 5.44.44 PM

(Notice this is only five plates and not eight even though you created three additional “colors” as tints. This is because the tints are not actually 3 new colors but versions of one color, a spot PMS color instead.)

Repeat the assignment using InDesign

  • New InDesign doc, uncheck the facing pages box, and select a single page layout
  • Create an image box (x-box) to import the sailing image into
  • Color Swatch pallet>>Options>>New color Swatch>>Color Mode to access the Pantone library
  • Import (Place) the shark graphic you created in Illustrator. Convert the colors of the shark to Spot with tints in Illustrator before exporting to InDesign. Cut & Paste the shark into a new Illustrator file. Do not Cut & Paste into InDesign. Instead use the Place command to import the shark Illustrator file graphic into InDesign. This will create an embedded or linked file.
  • Preflight by selecting Package from Menu>>File>>Package to check correct prep of all aspects of the fille for seamless production printing. Package command will collect fonts and linked files together with the InDesign file in one common folder on the desktop ready to be sent to the printer.
  1. Color Separations are found from Package>>Color and Inks.
  2. Package>>Report is where you, the designer, fill in your contact information and any special information about the file that you want to communicate to the printer. For this assignment, complete the Report file as a designer working for University of the Pacific. Indicate to the printer specifics about the spot Pantone color.

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